Vaccine Shots Every Woman Should Take Before & During Pregnancy - Go Health

Vaccine Shots Every Woman Should Take Before & During Pregnancy

Sudden changes in the immune system, heart and lungs make pregnant women more susceptible to serious ailments, and even death. Hence, it is imperative for women to get vaccinated before and during their pregnancies. The Federation of Obstetric and Gynaecological Societies of India (FOGSI) shares a compulsory immunisation schedule for pregnant women.

Pre-pregnancy

Rubella/German measles: This is for women with no history of rubella vaccination or a history of incomplete rubella vaccination. The vaccine should be given in the post-menstrual period. Pregnancy should be deferred for 3 months.

HPV: HPV vaccination should also be considered at this time. In case the woman becomes pregnant after receiving the first dose of HPV vaccination, the next dose should be deferred; however, there is no need to terminate the pregnancy. The rest of the dosages can be completed after delivery.

Varicella: This is for women with no history of varicella vaccination or a history of incomplete varicella vaccination. The vaccine should be given in the post-menstrual period. Pregnancy should be avoided for a month after the administration of the vaccine.

Hepatitis B: This is for women with no history of hepatitis B vaccination or a history of incomplete hepatitis B vaccination. The vaccine should be given in the post-menstrual period.

During Pregnancy

Tetanus/Diphtheria/Pertussis: In contrast to developed nations where tetanus is rare, it is still endemic in India. In 2012, there were 2404 cases of tetanus reported to the WHO from India. Tetanus diphtheria acellular pertussis (T-dap) vaccination can offer protection against diphtheria and pertussis in addition to tetanus. The regular pertussis vaccination is not advised during pregnancy. As recently as 2012, 2525 new cases of respiratory diphtheria were reported in India. For reasons that are not well understood, pockets of diphtheria are reappearing, primarily in developing countries.

Influenza: Influenza vaccination is recommended for mothers after 26 weeks. The inactivated influenza vaccine (as opposed to live attenuated vaccine) is recommended during pregnancy. The number of pregnant women dying of the flu is on the rise. This can be prevented through immunisation. A single shot flu vaccine is the safest and most effective way to prevent the flu and provide immunity to the mother and the baby. Higher rates of influenza-associated complications recorded among pregnant women during the the 2009 H1N1 pandemic resulted in the recognition of pregnant women as a high-risk group and therefore vaccination is recommended.

Source: http://goo.gl/RCoE12